Review: Confess, by Colleen Hoover

Confess, by Colleen Hoover

Confess by Colleen Hoover
Published by Simon & Schuster Audio on March 10, 2015
Genre(s): fiction, contemporary, new adult, romance
Format & Pages: audiobook
Find on GoodreadsAmazonBarnes & Noble

Auburn Reed has her entire life mapped out. Her goals are in sight and there’s no room for mistakes. But when she walks into a Dallas art studio in search of a job, she doesn’t expect to find a deep attraction to the enigmatic artist who works there, Owen Gentry.

For once, Auburn takes a risk and puts her heart in control, only to discover Owen is keeping major secrets from coming out. The magnitude of his past threatens to destroy everything important to Auburn, and the only way to get her life back on track is to cut Owen out of it.

The last thing Owen wants is to lose Auburn, but he can’t seem to convince her that truth is sometimes as subjective as art. All he would have to do to save their relationship is confess. But in this case, the confession could be much more destructive than the actual sin…


Hmm. So this is my second attempt at reading Colleen Hoover’s work (the first being Too Late, on Wattpad), and I’m just not sure if it’s really my cup of tea – or coffee, as it were. Maybe I went in expecting too much, seeing the average rating on Goodreads to be 4.26 out of 5. But I was just so underwhelmed.

I listened to this in audiobook format, and was happy to hear a female voice (Elizabeth Louise) reading Auburn’s chapters and a male voice (Sebastian York) reading Owen’s. Both narrators did a fine job, and it made for an enjoyable experience that was easy to follow. Sometimes when listening to a book rather than visually reading it, the writing gets pushed into the background as the story flows around you. In this case, though, I noticed the wording itself and actually found Hoover’s writing to be quite beautiful.

“If my voice were a color, it would be white.”

The premise of this story is intriguing. And I like the unique twist of having a focus on art and how it added depth to an otherwise straightforward plot. But I didn’t connect at all with the characters, nor did I find there to be any chemistry between Auburn and Owen. And Trey’s character felt like an added plot device just to bring in extra drama when needed and forgotten when convenient.

Maybe it’s me. Maybe I’m at a stage in life that just doesn’t jive with the situations Hoover’s characters tend to experience. Or maybe I should try reading a physical book of Hoover’s and see if that format works better for me. This wasn’t bad, per say. But there were too many negatives in my mind to reasonably recommend this unless you love Hoover’s books in general.

3

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s