Book Review: Strike Me Down, by Mindy Mejia

Strike Me Down, by Mindy Mejia

Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia

Published by Atria Books on April 7, 2020 (expected)

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, suspense, thriller

Format & Length: e-book, 304

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

From the critically acclaimed author of Leave No Trace, the “nail-biting page-turner that grabs you early and never lets go” (The Real Book Spy), comes a visceral thriller following an accountant’s complicated and potentially deadly search for missing money.

Nora Trier catches thieves. As a forensic accountant and partner in her downtown Minneapolis firm, she’s unearthed millions in every corner of the world. She prides herself on her independence, the most essential currency of accounting, until her firm is hired by Strike.

An anti-corporate, feminist athletic empire, Strike is owned by Logan Russo, a brash and legendary kickboxer, and her marketing genius husband, Gregg Abbott. They’re about to host a major kickboxing tournament with twenty million dollars in prize money, and the chance for the champion to become the new face of the company. Gregg suspects his wife already has a new face in mind—a young trainer named Aaden, for whom Logan feels an unexpected connection.

Days before the tournament begins, it’s discovered that the prize money is missing. Gregg hires Nora’s firm to find both the thief and the money but Nora has a secret connection to Strike that threatens her independence. Her partner pressures her into taking the case anyway, hinting he has information about Strike that could change the course of the investigation in a shocking and deadly way.

A tense and unpredictable thriller that will keep you guessing until the very last page, Strike Me Down reveals the remarkable power of Mindy Mejia’s writing which “crosses back and forth between exquisite literary descriptions and thrilleresque escapes and acts of violence” (New York Journal of Books).

Continue reading “Book Review: Strike Me Down, by Mindy Mejia”

Book Review: The Last Human, by Zack Jordan

The Last Human, by Zack Jordan

The Last Human by Zack Jordan

Published by Del Rey on March 24, 2020 (expected)

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, science fiction

Format & Length: e-book, 432

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

The last human in the universe must battle unfathomable alien intelligences—and confront the truth about humanity—in this ambitious, galaxy-spanning debut

“A good old-fashioned space opera in a thoroughly fresh package.”—Andy Weir, author of The Martian

“Big ideas and believable science amid a roller-coaster ride of aliens, AI, superintelligence, and the future of humanity.”—Dennis E. Taylor, author of We Are Legion

Most days, Sarya doesn’t feel like the most terrifying creature in the galaxy. Most days, she’s got other things on her mind. Like hiding her identity among the hundreds of alien species roaming the corridors of Watertower Station. Or making sure her adoptive mother doesn’t casually eviscerate one of their neighbors. Again.

And most days, she can almost accept that she’ll never know the truth—that she’ll never know why humanity was deemed too dangerous to exist. Or whether she really is—impossibly—the lone survivor of a species destroyed a millennium ago. That is, until an encounter with a bounty hunter and a miles-long kinetic projectile leaves her life and her perspective shattered.

Thrown into the universe at the helm of a stolen ship—with the dubious assistance of a rebellious spacesuit, an android death enthusiast on his sixtieth lifetime, and a ball of fluff with an IQ in the thousands—Sarya begins to uncover an impossible truth. What if humanity’s death and her own existence are simply two moves in a demented cosmic game, one played out by vast alien intellects? Stranger still, what if these mad gods are offering Sarya a seat at their table—and a second chance for humanity?

The Last Human is a sneakily brilliant, gleefully oddball space-opera debut—a masterful play on perspective, intelligence, and free will, wrapped in a rollicking journey through a strange and crowded galaxy.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Last Human, by Zack Jordan”

Book Review: The Catalyst: How to Change Anyone’s Mind, by Jonah Berger

The Catalyst: How to Change Anyone's Mind, by Jonah Berger

The Catalyst: How to Change Anyone’s Mind by Jonah Berger

Published by Simon & Schuster on March 10, 2020 (expected)

Series: n/a

Genre(s): nonfiction

Format & Length: e-book, 272

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

From the author of New York Times bestsellers Contagious and Invisible Influence comes a revolutionary approach to changing anyone’s mind.

Everyone has something they want to change. Marketers want to change their customers’ minds and leaders want to change organizations. Start-ups want to change industries and nonprofits want to change the world. But change is hard. Often, we persuade and pressure and push, but nothing moves. Could there be a better way?

This book takes a different approach. Successful change agents know it’s not about pushing harder, or providing more information, it’s about being a catalyst. Catalysts remove roadblocks and reduce the barriers to change. Instead of asking, “How could I change someone’s mind?” they ask a different question: “Why haven’t they changed already? What’s stopping them?”

The Catalyst identifies the key barriers to change and how to mitigate them. You’ll learn how catalysts change minds in the toughest of situations: how hostage negotiators get people to come out with their hands up and how marketers get new products to catch on, how leaders transform organizational culture and how activists ignite social movements, how substance abuse counselors get addicts to realize they have a problem and how political canvassers change deeply rooted political beliefs.

This book is designed for anyone who wants to catalyze change. It provides a powerful way of thinking and a range of techniques that can lead to extraordinary results. Whether you’re trying to change one person, transform an organization, or shift the way an entire industry does business, this book will teach you how to become a catalyst.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Catalyst: How to Change Anyone’s Mind, by Jonah Berger”

Book Review: The Atlantis Bloodline, by C.A. Gray

The Atlantis Bloodline, by C.A. Gray

The Atlantis Bloodline by C.A. Gray

Published by C.A. Gray on March 2, 2020

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, young adult

Format & Length: e-book, 480

Source: author

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble

When sweet Ada Edwards meets the mysterious Kaison Hughes, lead singer of the biggest band in the world, she can’t understand what he sees in her. Despite everyone’s warnings about him, she’s rapidly falling in love. But it’s obvious he has a secret, and he’s not all he appears to be.

Kai’s life isn’t his own, and his fame isn’t the half of it. As a member of a secret organization known as the Elioud, descended from the Atlantean daughters of the Pleiades, he’s been commissioned with a task: to reintegrate the lost line of Maia into their ranks. It just so happens that Ada is the one they’ve been looking for. He doesn’t know what they intend to do to her, and he doesn’t care. All he wants is the prize for a successful mission: one unqualified wish, which he intends to spend on his beloved sister’s freedom.

There’s just one problem: Kai’s falling in love with Ada, too.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Atlantis Bloodline, by C.A. Gray”

Book Review: No Bad Deed, by Heather Chavez

No Bad Deed, by Heather Chavez

No Bad Deed by Heather Chavez

Published by William Morrow on February 18, 2020 (expected)

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, thriller

Format & Length: e-book, 320

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

Packed with the electrifying pacing and pulse-pounding suspense of Harlan Coben and Lisa Gardner, a thrilling debut about a mother desperate to find the connections between her missing husband and a deadly stalker who knows too much about her own dark family history.

Driving home one rainy night, Cassie Larkin sees a man and woman fighting on the side of the road. After calling 911, the veterinarian makes a split-second decision that will throw her sedate suburban life into chaos. Against all reason and advice, she gets out of her minivan and chases after the violent man, trying to help his victim. When Cassie physically tries to stop him, he suddenly turns on her and spits out an ominous threat: “Let her die, and I’ll let you live.”

A veterinarian trained to heal, Cassie can’t let the woman die. But while she’s examining the unconscious victim, the attacker steals her car. Now he has her name. Her address. And he knows about her children. Though they warn her to be careful, the police assure her that the perpetrator—a criminal named Carver Sweet—won’t get near her. Cassie isn’t so sure.

The next day—Halloween—her husband disappears while trick-or-treating with their six-year-old daughter. Are these disturbing events a coincidence or the beginning of a horrifying nightmare? Her husband has been growing distant—is it possible he’s become involved with another woman? Is Cassie’s confrontation with the road-side attacker connected to her husband’s disappearance? With all these questions swirling in her mind Cassie can trust no one, maybe not even herself. The only thing she knows for sure is that she can’t sit back while the people she loves are in danger.

As she desperately searches for answers, Cassie discovers that nothing is as random as it seems, and that she is more than willing to fight—to go the most terrifying extremes—to save her family and her marriage.

Continue reading “Book Review: No Bad Deed, by Heather Chavez”

Mini Reviews: Nonfiction – From the Corner of the Oval, by Beck Dorey-Stein & Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child, by Marc Weissbluth, M.D.

Mini reviews - nonfiction

For this set of mini reviews, I want to talk about some nonfiction books I’ve read fairly recently. Although both nonfiction, these are very different in their subgenres, one being a memoir and the other a self-help/parenting book. I had mixed feelings on both of these, but each are worth a read for their own reasons.

Ready to see the reviews?

Continue reading “Mini Reviews: Nonfiction – From the Corner of the Oval, by Beck Dorey-Stein & Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child, by Marc Weissbluth, M.D.”

Book Review: The Wives, by Tarryn Fisher

The Wives, by Tarryn Fisher

The Wives by Tarryn Fisher

Published by Graydon House on December 30, 2019

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, suspense, thriller

Format & Length: hardcover, 320

Source: purchased

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

Imagine that your husband has two other wives.

You’ve never met the other wives. None of you know each other, and because of this unconventional arrangement, you can see your husband only one day a week. But you love him so much you don’t care. Or at least that’s what you’ve told yourself.

But one day, while you’re doing laundry, you find a scrap of paper in his pocket—an appointment reminder for a woman named Hannah, and you just know it’s another of the wives.

You thought you were fine with your arrangement, but you can’t help yourself: you track her down, and, under false pretenses, you strike up a friendship. Hannah has no idea who you really are. Then, Hannah starts showing up to your coffee dates with telltale bruises, and you realize she’s being abused by her husband. Who, of course, is also your husband. But you’ve never known him to be violent, ever.

Who exactly is your husband, and how far would you go to find the truth? Would you risk your own life?

And who is his mysterious third wife?

Continue reading “Book Review: The Wives, by Tarryn Fisher”

Book Review: Things in Jars, by Jess Kidd

Things in Jars, by Jess Kidd

Things in Jars by Jess Kidd

Published by Atria Books on February 4, 2020 (expected)

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, historical fiction, magical realism, mystery

Format & Length: e-book, 384

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

In the dark underbelly of Victorian London, a formidable female sleuth is pulled into the macabre world of fanatical anatomists and crooked surgeons while investigating the kidnapping of an extraordinary child in this gothic mystery—perfect for fans of The Essex Serpent and The Book of Speculation.

Bridie Devine—female detective extraordinaire—is confronted with the most baffling puzzle yet: the kidnapping of Christabel Berwick, secret daughter of Sir Edmund Athelstan Berwick, and a peculiar child whose reputed supernatural powers have captured the unwanted attention of collectors trading curiosities in this age of discovery.

Winding her way through the labyrinthine, sooty streets of Victorian London, Bridie won’t rest until she finds the young girl, even if it means unearthing a past that she’d rather keep buried. Luckily, her search is aided by an enchanting cast of characters, including a seven-foot tall housemaid; a melancholic, tattoo-covered ghost; and an avuncular apothecary. But secrets abound in this foggy underworld where spectacle is king and nothing is quite what it seems.

Blending darkness and light, history and folklore, Things in Jars is a spellbinding Gothic mystery that collapses the boundary between fact and fairy tale to stunning effect and explores what it means to be human in inhumane times.

Continue reading “Book Review: Things in Jars, by Jess Kidd”

Book Review: Ninth House, by Leigh Bardugo

Ninth House, by Leigh Bardugo

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

Published by Flatiron Books on October 8, 2019

Series: Alex Stern, #1

Genre(s): fiction, fantasy

Format & Length: hardcover, 458

Source: Netgalley

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. By age twenty, in fact, she is the sole survivor of a horrific, unsolved multiple homicide. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most elite universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

Still searching for answers to this herself, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies. These eight windowless “tombs” are well-known to be haunts of the future rich and powerful, from high-ranking politicos to Wall Street and Hollywood’s biggest players. But their occult activities are revealed to be more sinister and more extraordinary than any paranoid imagination might conceive.

The mesmerizing adult debut from #1 New York Times bestselling author Leigh Bardugo.

Continue reading “Book Review: Ninth House, by Leigh Bardugo”

Book Review: Future Visions: Original Science Fiction Inspired by Microsoft, by Various

Future Visions, by Various

Future Visions: Original Science Fiction Inspired by Microsoft by Various

Published by Microsoft & Melcher Media on November 17, 2015

Series: n/a

Genre(s): fiction, science fiction

Format & Length: e-book, 224

Source: purchased

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble

Future Visions: Original Science Fiction Inspired by Microsoft is an anthology of new short work from some of the greatest science fiction writers in the field. These visionary stories explore prediction science, quantum computing, real-time translation, machine learning, and much more. The authors used inside access to leading-edge work from Microsoft Research as inspiration, crafting pieces that predict the near-future of technology – and examine its complex relationship to our core humanity.

Future Visions features contributions from:

Elizabeth Bear
Greg Bear
David Brin
Nancy Kress
Ann Leckie
Jack McDevitt
Seanan McGuire
Robert J. Sawyer
…along with a short graphic novel by Blue Delliquanti and Michele Rosenthal, plus original illustrations by Joey Camacho.

These are some of today’s most visionary creators—and they’ve joined together to give us a preview of tomorrow.

Continue reading “Book Review: Future Visions: Original Science Fiction Inspired by Microsoft, by Various”