Book Review: Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live), by Eve Rodsky

Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live), by Eve Rodsky

Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live) by Eve Rodsky

Published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons on October 1, 2019

Series: n/a

Genre(s): nonfiction

Format & Length: hardcover, 352

Source: library

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository

A revolutionary, real-world solution to the problem of unpaid, invisible work that women have shouldered for too long–from a woman tapped by Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine as the expert on this topic for a new generation of women.

It started with the Sh*t I Do List. Tired of being the “shefault” parent responsible for all aspects of her busy household, Eve Rodsky counted up all the unpaid, invisible work she was doing for her family — and then sent that list to her husband, asking for things to change. His response was… underwhelming. Rodsky realized that simply identifying the issue of unequal labor on the home front wasn’t enough: She needed a solution to this universal problem. Her sanity, identity, career (and her marriage) depended on it.

The result is Fair Play: a time- and anxiety-saving system that offers couples a completely new way to divvy up domestic responsibilities. Rodsky interviewed more than five hundred men and women from all walks of life to figure out what the invisible work in a family actually entails and how to get it all done efficiently. With four easy-to-follow rules, 100 household tasks, and a figurative card game you play with your partner, Fair Play helps you prioritize what’s important to your family and who should take the lead on every chore from laundry to homework to dinner.

“Winning” this game means rebalancing your home life, reigniting your relationship with your significant other, and reclaiming your Unicorn Space — as in, the time to develop the skills and passions that keep you interested and interesting. Are you ready to try Fair Play? Let’s deal you in.

Continue reading “Book Review: Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live), by Eve Rodsky”

Mini Reviews: Nonfiction Book vs. Movie – Bringing Down the House, by Ben Mezrich, Hidden Figures, by Margot Lee Shetterly & Molly’s Game, by Molly Bloom

Mini Reviews: Nonfiction Book vs. Movie

For this set of mini reviews, I want to talk about some nonfiction books I’ve read fairly recently and compare them to their movie adaptations. I’d seen all of these movies first before even knowing they were books and when I discovered they were adaptations wanted to check them out in their original format. In each of these cases, I found the book and movie to be fairly complementary but some were slightly stronger in one format or the other.

Ready to see the reviews?

Continue reading “Mini Reviews: Nonfiction Book vs. Movie – Bringing Down the House, by Ben Mezrich, Hidden Figures, by Margot Lee Shetterly & Molly’s Game, by Molly Bloom”

Mini reviews: Nonfiction – Hunger, by Roxane Gay & The Fact of a Body, by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

Mini reviews: Nonfiction

Happy Friday! Who else is ready for the weekend?

I’m excited to bring a new series of posts to you today in the form of mini reviews! These will include two to three books that are within the same genre or run along similar veins, and briefly sum up my thoughts on each book in just a short paragraph. It’s likely these will tend to be nonfiction books, but there may be some fiction sprinkled in as well. I hope to post at least one set of mini reviews each month, but it will just depend on how busy life is at the time and how many books I wind up reading.

Today I’ll be reviewing a couple of memoirs: Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, by Roxane Gay; and The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich. I listened to both of these on audiobook a few months back and was struck by the similarities despite the difference in their tone and content. Ready to see the reviews?

Continue reading “Mini reviews: Nonfiction – Hunger, by Roxane Gay & The Fact of a Body, by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich”

Book Review: Reading People: How Seeing the World Through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything, by Anne Bogel

Reading People, by Anne Bogel

Reading People: How Seeing the World Through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel

Published by Baker Books on September 19, 2017

Series: n/a

Genre(s): nonfiction

Format & Length: e-book, 217

Source: purchased

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Purchase at AmazonBarnes & Noble, Book Depository

If the viral Buzzfeed-style personality quizzes are any indication, we are collectively obsessed with the idea of defining and knowing ourselves and our unique place in the world. But what we’re finding is this: knowing which Harry Potter character you are is easy, but actually knowing yourself isn’t as simple as just checking a few boxes on an online quiz.

For readers who long to dig deeper into what makes them uniquely them (and why that matters), popular blogger Anne Bogel has done the hard part–collecting, exploring, and explaining the most popular personality frameworks, such as Myers-Briggs, StrengthsFinder, Enneagram, and others. She explains to readers the life-changing insights that can be gained from each and shares specific, practical real-life applications across all facets of life, including love and marriage, productivity, parenting, the workplace, and spiritual life. In her friendly, relatable style, Bogel shares engaging personal stories that show firsthand how understanding personality can revolutionize the way we live, love, work, and pray.

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Book Review: The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson

The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson

The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Published by Vintage Books on February 10, 2004

Series: n/a

Genre(s): nonfiction, true crime

Format & Length: paperback, 447

Source: friend

Find on Goodreads

Purchase at AmazonBarnes & Noble

Bringing Chicago circa 1893 to vivid life. A book that intertwines the true tale of two men – the brilliant architect behind the legendary 1893 World’s Fair, striving to secure America’s place in the world: and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to their death.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson”